Tasmania Made Easy

By Lauren Howie, The University of Melbourne

Unlike the other Universities in Australia, Melbourne coordinates its midterm break with the AFL final (this is normally around nine weeks into the academic term). By this point you will defo want a holiday, so take that time to plan and book yourself a great trip away!

Chain of Lagoons, Tasmania
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Some photos from a year in New Zealand

Emily Barnes // University of Auckland

New Zealand is such an amazing country and the landscapes and views are always beautiful, no matter what the weather or time of year. Over the course of my year I took thousands of photos, so for my last post, I thought I’d share a video of some of my favourites so you can really get an idea for how diverse and awesome New Zealand actually is!

My Top 5 Beaches in Sydney

By Issy Jackson (University of Sydney, Australia)

On my very first day at the University of Sydney, I walked out of my last lecture for the day at lunchtime to beautiful blue skies and sunshine when I was met with a problem that I would get very used to over my time on exchange: Which beach to go to?! There are over 100 beaches in Sydney so I’m going to share with you my top 5.

Camp Cove

Getting the ferry to any of the beaches along Watson’s Bay from Circular Quay is a ‘pinch-me’ moment every single time as you watch the Harbour Bridge, the Opera House, the North Shore and the Royal Botanical Gardens pass you by. What’s more, you can set up your towel on the never-too-busy harbour beach, look out to the ocean and see both the CBD sky line as well as the infamous Harbour Bridge too. Watson’s Bay is more of a domestic suburb than your touristy Bondi and Cooggee, so rather than having a load of shops, Camp Cove just has one little kiosk for your mid-afternoon ice cream. If that’s not enough, the Hornby Lighthouse National Park is right next-door for a thirty-minute walk overlooking Middle Head and North Head. It’s one of my favourite places to watch the sun set.

Tamarama Beach

Located along the infamous Bondi to Cooggee Coastal walk, Tamarama is the perfect spot for an afternoon surf that feels slightly more local than the sprawling white sands of Bondi Beach. Nestled at the bottom of a Tamarama Park with beautiful cliff edges, greenery, water and sand, this petite bay is one of the most picturesque beaches in the Eastern Suburbs. Not only does it make for a great surf in the Pacific, it has just one little café next to the park where you can enjoy your food on the patio overlooking the sand.

Cronulla Beach

Slightly further afield is Cronulla, where the hour-long train journey is perfect to get cracking with some uni work while watching tall sky scrapers of Central turn into boutique shops and beach houses. As a busier beach and one of the main surfing destinations away from the touristy Eastern suburbs, Cronulla is the perfect place to try and learn from the locals. Aside from the sand itself, Cronulla has a thriving town centre so whether you’re looking for the best acai bowl in Sydney or souvenirs for the family, a walk around these wide, bright streets is a great place to start.

Clontarf Beach

The Spit to Manly Walk is one of the nicest coastal treks in Sydney which includes lizards, crabs, forest and Indigenous artwork. Getting a bus to Spit and the ferry back from Manly means you get to see heaps of the city itself too. Halfway through this track sits Clontarf Beach. The Harbour Beaches are usually slightly off the beaten track and provide a nice contrast from the hectic waves and chaos of the Pacific shore. Such serene stillness paired with some of the clearest waters I have ever seen makes Clontarf a great place for snorkelling or paddle boarding too.

Balmoral Beach

My favourite thing about Balmoral Beach is how it really seems the heart of the community in Mosman. It is always thriving with dog-walkers, locals swimming lengths along the shore line, families setting up picnics and friends meeting for coffees. Balmoral is also a great place to go for a typical Aussie brunch, whether you fancy sitting along the boardwalk or even at the end of the jetty, there are plenty of cafes serving every style of Eggs Benedict you could possibly imagine.

First impressions of Perth and the University of Western Australia

Moving to Western Australia, I remember someone telling me that Perth was the most remote capital city in the world. Initially this didn’t appeal to me as I have enjoyed living in the UK. My family home is about an hour away from London and studying in Manchester I had direct links to all major UK cities. Additionally, adventure is never far away with flights all over Europe being cheap and relatively inexpensive. Perth located in Australia’s largest state of Western Australia is completely isolated surrounded by nature and tiny towns. However, what I have found is so much greater than I imagined. Perth offers something totally unique. You get the benefits of living in a large modern metropolitan city, whilst being surrounded by some of the most beautiful and secluded spots on the planet.

When I first arrived in Perth I stayed in ‘Mumma’s Hostel’ located in the trendy area of Perth known as Northbridge. Soon after I was offered a place at St Catherine’s residential college. Living in college is a completely different experience. It is like halls, but the residents tend to stay there for their entire degrees. Everyone is super friendly, so despite only having just arrived I was able to celebrate my 20th with friends.

The university itself is beautiful, the architecture is stunning. I’ve seen people come and take their wedding photos here. My walk to class feels like walking through a botanical garden. There are even peacocks that wonder around the campus!

Although it was initially weird leaving, especially going from summer to what the Aussies call winter (20c weather and blue skies). I am really enjoying my time in Perth so far. The people are relaxed, the coffee is great, and the natural beauty of the area is exceptional. I can’t wait to live and create many memories here in Australia.

Life back in Manchester

Emily Barnes // University of Auckland

I’ve been back in Manchester two weeks now and have just finished my first week back in lectures. It’s been surprisingly easy to slot back into life at Manchester and it’s almost like I never left.

One of the reasons I was initially hesitant to do a study abroad year was that all my friends would graduate, and I’d have no one when I got back to Manchester, however it’s turned out to be almost the complete opposite. Minus two of my closest friends, everyone else is still living here, either doing masters or working, which has worked out really well. I also feel a lot more confident making new friends now and joining societies and stuff, so I’d say if anyone’s feeling something similar, not to worry as things do tend to work themselves out!

Another reason I wanted to go on a year abroad was that I didn’t feel quite ready to really knuckle down for third year and start thinking about what I wanted to do after university. After spending a year abroad, with minimal university pressure as I only had to pass the year, I feel like I now have the motivation that I was maybe missing before. I’ve also had time to really think about what I want to do both in my final year, and after university which is something I wasn’t expecting but am now glad to have.

But of course, I really miss Auckland and the more relaxed kiwi style of life. Living so close to the sea and being able to go on road trips every weekend was really cool and can make living in Manchester a little bleak in comparison! I used to love walking around Auckland with all the volcanic cones so not being able to leave my flat and walk up Mt Eden in half an hour does take some getting used to!

harbour
My favourite view in the city centre – looking at the sky tower from the harbour 

I honestly couldn’t recommend going on a year abroad to anyone enough as it is hands down the best thing I’ve ever done and I’m so grateful that I had the opportunity to live and study in New Zealand for a year. But now it’s time for third year and I’m excited to see what my final year at Manchester will bring!

A Comparative Map: Manchester vs. Perth

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_vkQtLFlJEZjE2SSF_fYOoayKM4486mQ&usp=sharing

Click or copy and paste the link above to access the map. Make sure to zoom in on both cities and click on the icons for descriptions of each pinned location.

This map demonstrates my experience studying at the University of Western Australia, compared to the University of Manchester.

Locations such as my home, the library, and my study spaces have been pinned. These show the spatial difference between Manchester and Perth as well as showing my movement in the cities.

By clicking on the different pins and reading the descriptions, you can view how locations in the separate cities differ.

Furthermore, comments on the assessment style difference can be found under ‘Main Library’.

The main finding when completing this map has been seeing how little space I occupy in Perth. Compared to Manchester, where I cover 10km more.
This shows the difference between a campus university and a city university. As well as how they influence your learning experience, sense of place and movement.

Top 5 reasons to study in New Zealand

Emily Barnes // University of Auckland

If you’d have told me two years ago that I would have just got back from studying abroad in New Zealand for a year, I would have thought you were crazy. I’d always known I wanted to go on a study abroad exchange year, but for some reason, I always imagined myself studying in the USA. However, it wasn’t until I started the application process that I even realised New Zealand or Australia were options for me. I then began researching the two and decided, despite never having even been remotely close to that part of the world before, that I wanted to study in New Zealand. And now, looking back on my year, I’m so glad I did. So, here are my top five reasons for why you should choose New Zeland for a year abroad.

1) Excellent Universities

A bit of an obvious reason, but the main purpose of the year is to experience studying in a different country, so it’s important that the universities are good. Auckland University is New Zealand’s largest and most prestigious university and I really enjoyed studying there. There was a wide range of module choices, the lecturers were really good and the campus was also really nice, with a modern science centre and new business school.

2) A Year Long Exchange

The university year starts in March for New Zealand and Australia, so for an exchange year, you head out in July and do semester 2, followed by a four-month long summer, and then semester 1, finishing at the end of June a year later. This means you get a full year away, rather than the nine months or so you’d get with a northern hemisphere exchange, to explore New Zealand and its surroundings.

relective lake
Franz Joseph glacier just around the corner

3) Amazing Country

 I think it’s fair to say New Zealand is one of the most stunning countries in the world, with an amazing landscape filled with diverse flora and fauna. It’s also really achievable to visit the whole country during a year, with the long summer and 2x two week-long mid-semester breaks ideal for travelling. Getting around the country is also really easy, with cheap hire cars, frequent airline sales and multiple intercity buses.

mystery machine
A mystery machine van my friends hired for their road trip

4) The People and Culture

All the people I met in New Zealand were so friendly and welcoming. It was so easy to make friends and everyone seemed genuinely interested in getting to know you. My course mates were always asking what I’d been up to at the weekend and giving me tips on where to go next. I was also surprised at the huge range of nationalities within New Zealand and met so many people from different places all over the globe. The university was also great at highlighting specific culture/nationality weeks, such as Maori week or Samoan week, from which I learnt loads.

5) New Zealand’s Location within the Pacific

Whilst a world away from the UK, New Zealand has a prime location within the Pacific, with close proximity to Australia, the Pacific Islands, and parts of Asia. Cheap airline tickets and the long summer holiday means lots of opportunities for travel and I knew people that went to Bali for mid-semester break, or the Cook Islands for a week during summer. I went to Australia for a month back in November, taking advantage of an airline sale so my plane ticket there only cost $150 (£75)!

plane
View flying into Queenstown in the South Island

 

These are only the beginning of a very long list as to why New Zealand is an amazing study abroad destination, but hopefully they’ve inspired you to consider it yourself!

Melbourne Made Easy

By Lauren Howie, The University of Melbourne

Time has soared by since I first set foot in Melbourne. Now 8 weeks into the Aussie dream (and loving every second of it) I’ve decided to put together a list of 5 life hacks that made settling into this fantastic city a lot less daunting!

Houses in Fitzroy
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The End of a Chapter: Coming Home and Reminiscing

By Claire Muller (University of Sydney, Australia)

Hey Guys!

As of Wednesday (24th), it’s officially been a week since I left Australia and ended my study abroad year at USYD (University of Sydney). As sad as I was to leave Sydney, my friends and the wonderful memories I’ve made over the past year behind, I’ll admit that I am quite relieved and excited to be back home. A year can be quite a long time.

However, the thought of this chapter of my life finally coming to an end still saddens me a little. I will miss the friends I’ve made, who helped make my study aboard experience so much more fulfilling & excited as well as helped me become a more confident & life-loving individual. The fact that we are now on either side of the world, instead of on either side of a corridor, did put a damper to my mood a couple days before leaving. However, with the presence of Facebook and Facetime, I could easily have a chat and catch up with them, keeping the friendship going strong. Traveling to Australia from Europe, though expensive, is always a possibility to visit everyone back there. In my opinion, the thought of being able to keep in touch with everyone back in Australia helped with the somewhat sorrow I felt of leaving everyone behind.

There was a quote that I found whilst scrolling through Instagram that really hit home. It’s a quote by Thomas Wilder:

‘It’s hard to turn the page when you know someone won’t be in the next chapter, but the story must go on.’

I really could relate to the quote, particularly whenever I looked back on the adventures I had followed over the past year. As much as I will miss the people I’ve met there, the story must go on and my time in Australia is temporarily over for now.

Even though this chapter in my life has finally come to an end, I can rest assured that I have ended the chapter with no regrets. Before coming to Australia, I told myself that I wanted to leave with no regrets about my year abroad experience. I told myself that I would try to get out of my comfort zone, in any manner that I could; which I did through multiple ways (e.g. skydiving, bungy-jumping, getting a tattoo, driving on the wrong side of the road). I can honestly say that I have left Australia as a completely different person to who I was when I first arrived (in a good way), and I am so proud of myself for the accomplishments that I have been able to complete over the past year. I can only hope that I will look back on my time in Sydney with nothing but a smile.

I will always have fond memories of my time in Australia, because I was able to cross out quite a few bucket-list items (e.g. swimming along the Great Barrier Reef, holding a koala at Australia Zoo, witnessing sunset/sunrise at Uluru, seeing Tasmanian devils in the wild) as well as created many memories (e.g. Witnessing the Sydney New Year’s fireworks with my best friend, driving along the Great Ocean Road, walking through a rainforest surrounded by hundreds of birds, visiting old friends, spending my 21st birthday in New Zealand, etc.).

I will also have memories that I am not so fond of, some that I wish I could forget (e.g. having a Huntsman spider crawl up my leg whilst watching Harry Potter, queueing for 24hours in sun/rain/storm to see the New Year’s fireworks, walking up the Giant Staircase in Katoomba and finding out that there are actually 900+ steps to reach the top). However, even though I look at these memories negatively, I do not regret them because they made my time in Australia so much more interesting and livelier.

Honestly, as weird as this might sound to the majority of people returning from their time abroad, I am actually looking forward to returning back to Manchester for my final year, especially getting to see everyone again and catching up with their adventure. I actually have quite a bit planned for my final year at Manchester (e.g. society committees, internships, etc.), which probably helped with the blues I was feeling about leaving Sydney behind.

To sum my experience up, I don’t have any regrets and I’m happy about it.

Thank you for keeping up with my adventures! See you back in Manchester!

Claire

Making Friends Abroad (Introvert Edition)

Claire Muller – University Of Sydney, Australia 

Hey Guys!

So, I wanted to talk to you guys today about how I dealt with making friends, whilst being an introvert studying abroad. Studying abroad can be an extremely stressful situation; you are going to another country and culture, where you know no one and you have to try to find a way to thrive whilst also focusing on studying at the same time and being an introvert (making socializing a task in itself). You know… stressful. Anyway, I’ve come up with some ways to help you in navigating through your study abroad experience.

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Finding Accommodation In Sydney: Thinking Outside the Box

Claire Muller – University of Sydney, Australia 

Hey guys,

So, I wanted to talk to you guys about the evidently stressful topic of trying to find the right accommodation for your time abroad. When researching options, you could be lucky and find an absolute gem or be faced with your worst nightmare. However, by doing the right research and keeping an open mind, you could be surprised by the options out there.  I’m going to give you a few options that might be of interest to you, all depending on what your needs and expectations are. I’ll also include some pros and cons to spice things up a little.

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